Brimbank,
26
July
2017
|
16:00
Australia/Melbourne

Community and artists team with Council to stop littering

Summary

‘Love where you live’, ‘the drain is just for rain’ and ‘rubbish on the street ends up in the creek’ are the catchcry phrases you can see around Brimbank.

Mayor of Brimbank, Cr John Hedditch said Council won’t back down on its quest to tackle the problem of illegal rubbish dumping and will continue to look for ways to keep Brimbank clean and safe.

“Part of Council’s crackdown and ongoing commitment to clean up Brimbank includes the establishment of a litter innovation project, an initiative part-funded by Sustainability Victoria, to install monitoring infrastructure, litter enforcement activities and broaden community engagement and education on illegal rubbish dumping.

Solar powered surveillance

“High-tech solar powered surveillance cameras are now operating 24/7 in known illegal rubbish dumping hotspots, fitted with motion detection, night vision and automatic number plate recognition capabilities. If the cameras detect human or vehicle activity, a loud siren rings and lights flash.

“Another of the innovative aspects of the project has been the recent installation of large stickers on 100 Council-owned storm water drains around Brimbank, in collaboration with community groups ‘Beautiful Brimbank’ and ‘Friends of Kororoit Creek’.

“The artwork for the stickers was designed and installed by local artist and member of community groups, Jessica Gerger and captures specific messages about the impact of rubbish on drainage, waterways and local wildlife. The stickers feature three local species; the growling grass frog, the white plumed honey eater and the golden sun moth.

Rubbish pollutes our waterways

“The messaging behind these visual works of art is about familiarising residents and businesses on how improperly disposed materials can seriously affect stormwater. Dumped materials can contaminate water run-off polluting local waterways, drains and eventually Port Phillip Bay. It can suffocate wildlife, block water pipes and lead to local flooding.

“Illegal dumping control is important and by locating and correcting such behaviours through education and enforcement measures, the many risks to public safety and water quality associated with illegal disposal can be significantly reduced,” said Cr Hedditch.

For further information about this initiative or to report suspected illegal dumping, use our online reporting tool at our website or telephone 9249 4000.