Brimbank,
22
June
2018
|
05:50
Australia/Melbourne

Council seeks assurances on Airport contamination

Summary

Brimbank Council is seeking formal assurances that environmental and community safety is not at risk, of PFAS (Per-and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances) contamination of local waterways.

Brimbank Council is seeking formal assurances that environmental and community safety is not at risk, of PFAS (Per-and poly-fluorinated alkyl substances) contamination of local waterways caused by the types of chemicals used in legacy firefighting foams at Melbourne Airport.

Brimbank Council was recently made aware of a local contamination issue concerning PFAS and is committed to finding out what’s going on and who is going to lead remediation action.

Brimbank Mayor Cr Margaret Giudice said Council would write to the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) as well as State and Federal Ministers to request the release of longitudinal data on the health of the Maribyrnong River, Steele Creek, Steele Creek North and Arundel Creek.

“We want an understanding of how long Federal and State governments have known about the presence of PFAS at Melbourne Airport, and about how local residents and waterway groups are being kept informed of remediation action.

“Importantly, we want confirmation of which agency is taking responsibility for the oversight of the clean-up of PFAS at the airport.

“Our community needs to know that our environment and waterways are protected from contamination,” Cr Giudice said.

Cr John Hedditch, who moved a Notice of Motion asking Council to write to the EPA and Ministers seeking advice on action in relation to the PFAS contamination of Brimbank waterways, said this is a serious and important issue for the Brimbank community.

“There are nasty things in our waterways and this is a major problem, and we don’t know to what extent. The community has told us they can’t get answers either.

“It is unclear just how far the contamination has spread, and that is just not good enough.

“We want the federal authorities and the EPA to tell us who has responsibility for this, and what’s going on.

“We need this issue resolved at the earliest,” Cr Hedditch said.

Anyone concerned should contact the Melbourne Airport directly on 9297 1597.